It’s HEART Month for Love & Health

February is a great time to celebrate  Valentine’s Day, and being grateful for the  love in our lives.  It’s also Heart Awareness Month.  Yes!  As a Brave Heart survivor of open heart surgery of almost  25 years,  this is an issue close to my heart 😊 (pun intended).

Heart disease is a complicated health challenge all over the world.  However, in particular, this month I would like to call attention to the fact that  heart attack  symptoms  for women are quite different from the ones diagnosed for men.  In addition, women are often misdiagnosed in emergency rooms after the heart damage has occurred [ref: https://myheartsisters.org/2009/05/28/heart-attack-misdiagnosis-women].  Below are some of the signs women should consider when being diagnosed for heart disease.  Notice there is no suggestion of heavy chest pain.

Shortness of breath, Pain in one or both arms, Nausea or vomiting,
Sweating, Lightheadedness, or dizziness, Unusual fatigue, Indigestion.

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The Aspirin Question

Just when we thought we had the right information about taking aspirin,  a new study comes out to create confusion.  Even though I have had heart surgery, I must admit I do not take aspirin.  As a matter of fact, I only took it immediately after my open heart surgery 23 years ago.  My surgery   was not because of a heart attack. I stopped taking aspirin because of an allergic reaction one time, and I never took it again.  Now, it turns out that I am on the right side of what is healthy for my age.  Below is a summary of my findings, which I hope helps clear up a few things for you. Please use the source links for more detailed information.

♥ If you are 70 and older, there is no benefit at all to taking an aspirin a day, unless you have had a heart attack; have a stent; had a bypass surgery; suffer from angina, or had a stroke.
♥ The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that those in their 50s with a 10 percent higher risk because they have high blood pressure/high cholesterol, should continue to take aspirin.  The same is true for people in their 60s.
♥ Aspirin can cause bleeding, which can be dangerous. Find out from your doctor whether there are benefits for you. Continue reading