Reference for COVID-19

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This month I am at my wits end to assist in any way providing guidelines for the Coronavirus. The first link will take you to the government website.  New announcements about Telehealth services for senior citizens is important.  You can contact your doctor’s office for guidelines on how it works.

In addition, I received two reference pdf books about COVID-19  from a family member, and I think it is worth sharing.  It provides guidelines for how to care for yourself, as was understood at the time it was written.  Click the links for more information.

Government Websites:
https://www.hrsa.gov/
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

For Handbook Reference:
Corona Ebook.pdf

CoronaVirus Slide for kids.pdf

 

Take a look.  I hope it is helpful.
Wishing you wellness.pansy-427139_1280
Judith

 

It’s HEART Month for Love & Health

February is a great time to celebrate  Valentine’s Day, and being grateful for the  love in our lives.  It’s also Heart Awareness Month.  Yes!  As a Brave Heart survivor of open heart surgery of almost  25 years,  this is an issue close to my heart 😊 (pun intended).

Heart disease is a complicated health challenge all over the world.  However, in particular, this month I would like to call attention to the fact that  heart attack  symptoms  for women are quite different from the ones diagnosed for men.  In addition, women are often misdiagnosed in emergency rooms after the heart damage has occurred [ref: https://myheartsisters.org/2009/05/28/heart-attack-misdiagnosis-women].  Below are some of the signs women should consider when being diagnosed for heart disease.  Notice there is no suggestion of heavy chest pain.

Shortness of breath, Pain in one or both arms, Nausea or vomiting,
Sweating, Lightheadedness, or dizziness, Unusual fatigue, Indigestion.

Continue reading “It’s HEART Month for Love & Health”

Is a Good Night’s Sleep for Seniors Important?

Happy New Year!

Now that the  holiday furor  has settled down for most of us, I would like to share with you that I often hear my senior friends discussing how much sleep they are NOT getting.  Or, that they don’t NEED much sleep.

It turns out that it’s not a good thing when we are sleep deprived at any age. In his book “Why We Sleep“,  neuroscientist and sleep expert, Matthew Walker, gives us a new understanding of the vital importance of sleep and dreaming.  According to his research, sleep helps our ability to learn, regulates our appetite, assists with our well being and immune system. It affects our emotions, and metabolism. Walker further suggests we can utilize sleep to improve our energy levels, regulate hormones, prevent cancer, to name a few.  He also says that sleep slows the effects of aging. The list is much longer than what I have shown here.
According to a blog post I read, the less senior citizens sleep, the faster their brains age. I also learned that seven hours of sleep daily was perfect for cognitive function. In addition, sleep for senior citizens is important to provide time to heal from other health related issues.

Continue reading “Is a Good Night’s Sleep for Seniors Important?”

Exercise is a Win-Win Anytime We Start

If you haven’t already started your New Year’s Resolutions list for 2020, here’s a suggestion for senior citizens who are feeling guilty that they never exercised in 2019, and think it’s too late at this stage in their lives to start.

The good news  for 2020 is that anytime you start exercising you will gain benefits.  In last month’s post, we learned that we could gain a better night’s sleep just by taking a 30 minute walk. Also, younger folks in their 40’s, 50’s and 60’s can benefit as well.  Just 150 minutes of moderate- intensity exercise a week ‘fits the bill‘.  Ultimately, some exercise is better than none.
Park your car a little farther away, and walk to your destination.
Take the stairs more frequently.
Take short breaks during the day. Continue reading “Exercise is a Win-Win Anytime We Start”

Can walking help you sleep?

Living as a senior citizen comes with various challenges.  Some mornings I wake up with a pain I did not have the day before.  Other mornings, I find myself feeling a little anxious about an upcoming medical test, or just plain nervousness due to “who knows what?”

On occasion, my sleep is affected by nervousness (the latter occurrences).   I do find, however, that taking a 30 minute walk calms me down; makes my aches and pains more manageable, and I also sleep better during the night.

  • A recent study suggests that moving can enhance our sleep patterns, and,  in this case,  walking fits the bill.  It turns out that we do not have to work out strenuously in order to gain the benefit of a good night’s sleep.  Taking more steps during our monthly activity can give us better sleep quality. That’s welcome news for those of us who do not have the physical ability or time to do more intense routines.
  • In past posts we also learned that walking can help those of us with arthritis feel better and reduce pain.

Continue reading “Can walking help you sleep?”

That annoying CPAP machine/mask

This picture is somewhat of an exaggeration   However, I am sure some of us feel like we are  from another planet when we strap ourselves into a CPAP mask before retiring to get a ‘good night’s sleep‘.  It seems rather odd that this type of discomfort can actually be good for you.  So I took it upon myself to find out what the risks are associated with not using the CPAP mask, and if there are times when a little vacation from this routine is OK. Click the links for detailed information .

The Risk of not using your CPAP

Continue reading “That annoying CPAP machine/mask”

For Women: Are 10,000 Steps a Day Necessary?

Today I am celebrating 24 years since I had open heart surgery. Yes!

Walking is a really personal gift to me.  What do I mean?  After my surgery, I asked my Cardiologist,  “what type of exercise can I do?”  He recommended that I walk, which seemed easy enough to do.

However, the truth was,  after the surgery I did not have the strength to walk across a street by myself. At that point, I promised myself and the forces that guide us that if given the future opportunity to walk, I would make sure to honor that ability.
Continue reading “For Women: Are 10,000 Steps a Day Necessary?”

Baby Boomers and Dementia

 

I recently had the benefit of attending a talk about dementia and how to plan and live with this challenging condition/disease.

Dr. Tia Powell has written a book, “Dementia Reimagined …” . She weaves  in some of  her personal story as a means of inviting us to have a conversation about this  life changing condition.  Both her grandmother and mother had dementia.

Just two startling facts I learned  are that  10% of  Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964)  over the age of 65, and 50% of Boomers  85 and older  are expected to have some experience of dementia.  The longer we live, the more likely we may become subject to this condition/disease.

In addition, Dr. Powell discusses a positive approach to preparing to live with the possibility of dementia in our later years.  The glass is  half full and not a  more dismal half-empty outlook. She encourages us to “take on” this challenge to a life with “dignity and planning“.

Continue reading “Baby Boomers and Dementia”