Message to Elders & Parents: Play More, Live Better and Longer

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Play More?
What Does That Mean? Why Should I?

As we are continually confronted with the challenge of Covid19 worries, that impact  our lives,  I am sure we could all use a ‘Time-Out’  – in a positive way.

Research reveals that play as adults can help us to get some relief from our responsibilities, and find ways to manage the stress we feel. Not only will it be good for you, but if you have children, it can be a way to connect and relieve stress for them as well.  Worth thinking about?  The school year will begin shortly in a format that some of us have not quite figured out how to handle, and to bring ‘normalcy’  to our work and school days.  Maybe what we need is a little relief to help us cope through this period.  Below are some sources, which discuss various options and suggestions for placing ‘play’ in your life.

 

Photo by Edu Carvalho from Pexels

 

Sources for Ideas

https://psychcentral.com/blog/the-importance-of-play-for-adults/
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/play-in-mind

Hearing Aids? Do you need them? How do you know?

My Everyday Tools: Hearing Aids and Glasses

It seems odd that hearing aids are not something I focused on as a tool for assisting my “wellbeing” in a significant way.  If you think about it at all, it would seem that hearing aids are just as important as glasses for reading and driving. My favorite question these days, which I have adopted from Rachel Maddow of MSNBC –  “Why is that?

Flash back to August of 2017, when I wrote a post about hearing loss, and at that time I called attention to the research, which determined that dementia ( I repeat, dementia) could be related to hearing loss. (https://livingsenior.me/2017/08/21/hearing-loss-dementia/)

Flash forward, after a recent hearing test (have you had one lately? ever had one?), my Audiologist doctor determined that I required hearing aids due to hearing loss in both ears.  In addition, she was concerned because difficulty hearing raises dementia risk. There it is again: dementia and hearing loss are related.

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It’s HEART Month for Love & Health

February is a great time to celebrate  Valentine’s Day, and being grateful for the  love in our lives.  It’s also Heart Awareness Month.  Yes!  As a Brave Heart survivor of open heart surgery of almost  25 years,  this is an issue close to my heart 😊 (pun intended).

Heart disease is a complicated health challenge all over the world.  However, in particular, this month I would like to call attention to the fact that  heart attack  symptoms  for women are quite different from the ones diagnosed for men.  In addition, women are often misdiagnosed in emergency rooms after the heart damage has occurred [ref: https://myheartsisters.org/2009/05/28/heart-attack-misdiagnosis-women].  Below are some of the signs women should consider when being diagnosed for heart disease.  Notice there is no suggestion of heavy chest pain.

Shortness of breath, Pain in one or both arms, Nausea or vomiting,
Sweating, Lightheadedness, or dizziness, Unusual fatigue, Indigestion.

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Are there benefits to positive thinking?

I’m not one to make light of the fact that for some seniors aging is a difficult challenge. Loss of the ability to function the way we could when we were younger; loss of friends and companions; sickness.  All of these things add to enormous stress, and sometimes despondent feelings.  But what if thinking positively could help us out?  Should we at least try to find a way to cultivate this habit?

An article in the New York Times suggest that our thoughts can do “far more than raise one’s spirits”.  How about if thinking positively could boost your immune system, alleviate depression, lower your blood pressure, give you better weight control.  Would you try it?

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