Anosmia: A Conversation About The Loss of Smell

Anosmia is the medical term for the loss of smell. A post on the Harvard Health Blog reported that some patients with mild to moderate COVID-19 also had problems from loss of smell. In this episode of the Wellness Connections Podcast, Frauke Galia of F.A.L.K. Aromatherapy provides us with an inside look and understanding of this problem.

She tells us about the various ways she helps people to reignite their sense of smell using training methods, which includes using essential oils.

Frauke has a wealth of information to share with people who require help and assistance with this problem and empathizes in a way that can make a difference with anyone who is in need for direction toward getting “smell-well” again.

Use the links below for quick access to the information shared in the episode.

I Can’t Smell Page (falkaromatherapy.com)

An Aromatic Life Podcast (falkaromatherapy.com)

CURIOSITIES ABOUT SMELL (falkaromatherapy.com)

Your journey to aromatic wellness begins here (falkaromatherapy.com)

Podcast also available at:
Judith Guerra Wellness Connections • A podcast on Anchor

VIM App for Arthritis Sufferers

The Arthritis Foundation reports that the onset of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) generally affects persons in the age range of 30-60 years. The foundation also reports that RA affects children.

RA sufferers have a new tool to assist them with their various challenges brought on by this autoimmune and inflammatory disease. It is the VIM App.

My podcast provides a summary with details of how the Free VIM App works.

Download Apps using the links below for your Apple or Android Phone.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=guru.applica.vim

https://apps.apple.com/us/app/vim-pain-mgmt/id1562886172

You can listen to the Wellness Connections on other platforms
Just click the link below to select.
https://anchor.fm/judith-guerra7

Various arthritis blog posts are at the links below:

livingsenior.me | WellBeing Conversations
Arthritis Seasons & Remedies | livingsenior.me
Arthritis & Exercise | livingsenior.me
Arthritis Signs for Knees | livingsenior.me

Additional Sources:

Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms in Women (healthline.com)
Rheumatoid Arthritis: Causes, Symptoms, Treatments
Arthritis Foundation launching Vim app to help people manage chronic pain | PhillyVoice
Pharma News | Pharma Industry | Pharmaceuticals Industry | FiercePharma


What have you done for your skin lately?

This is a continuation of the SPF and skincare question.  Some of you may have listened to my summary on this topic at my Judith Guerra Wellness Connections Podcast on Spotify.  This post provides details for you on where you can find the tools you need to participate in a well-being program for your skin.

I happen to think men believe that women spend way too much time on their skin/beauty regimens, which could be true (LOL).

What some men may not know is that by age 50 men are more likely than women to develop melanoma. And, that number continues to increase. (At age 65, men are 2 times more likely as women the same age to get Melanoma). At the age of 80 it is 3 times more likely. The research facts reveal Melanoma is harder on men. Melanoma strikes men harder – AAD

I can actually confirm that none of the men I know use SPF.
If you are a man reading this post – do you? On a walk recently, I asked a neighbor, whom I see often, whether he had on SPF – he quickly admitted he did not. In addition, he did not have on a hat. This man is about 65-70 years old. I suggested he may want to consider using an SPF. He promised he would. As I said, The research shows that at his age he is 2 times more likely than a woman to develop melanoma. According to the AAD: 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime.

In addition, Melanoma is more than 20 times more common in whites than in African Americans. Overall, the lifetime risk of getting melanoma is about 2.6% (1 in 38) for whites, 0.1% (1 in 1,000) for Blacks, and 0.6% (1 in 167) for Hispanics.


Although skin cancer is less prevalent in the black community than in the white population, when it does occur among people of color, it tends to be diagnosed at a later, and more advanced, stage.

♥ Studies show that black people are four times more likely to be diagnosed with advanced stage melanoma and tend to succumb at a rate of 1.5 times more than white people with a similar diagnosis. The Sunscreen Gap: Why Black People Still Need SPF (healthline.com)

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Summer Fun and SkinCare

After one year fighting the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic, we are ready to once again return to activities outside of our homes. I checked what steps we should consider taking to protect our skin. In addition, what support systems are available to help us determine if any change(s) to our skin have occurred during this stressful period.

You can listen to my Podcast on Spotify, which will give you a summary of my upcoming blog post.
Spotify is a free app, that you can download on your mobile device, from the Google Play or Apple app store. You can also download the app to your desktop computer.

Later this month, I will post” What have you done for your skin lately?” with detailed information and links on my livingsenior.me blog. This will give you an opportunity to explore on your own how to keep your skin looking and feeling well.

I look forward to continuing sharing these well-being conversations and ideas with you. Let’s stay connected.

Also available on Apple Podcast

Considering Integrative Medicine

Integrative Medicine is often referred to as a way of “complementing” our wellness regimen by enhancing our body, mind and spirit experiences. What does that mean?

First, Integrative Medicine is not to be considered a “substitute for conventional medicine”. However, it can help with treating your well-being by “adding” to your regular medical program.

Second, some complementary/integrative methods are: Aromatherapy, Music Therapy, Acupuncture, Meditation, and Dietary Supplements. Living Senior has posted articles on these topics in the past: Links to My Other Posts | livingsenior.me

Third, let’s explore some ideas that can help with our wellness regimen, which are considered complementary.

A friend called my attention to the People’s Pharmacy, which began in 1976 to aide us in making decisions about medical and alternative treatments. They also have a database of Home Remedies at this link: Home Remedies | The People’s Pharmacy (peoplespharmacy.com)

A source I use for Integrative medicine guidelines, and how to understand the different terminology is Dr. Andrew Weil. He has been a pioneer in Integrative Medicine for thirty years.

You can signup for his newsletters at the link below:
DrWeil.com Newsletters | Andrew Weil, M.D.

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Aging Gracefully? What is it?

Photo by RODNAE Productions on Pexels.com

As an ‘elder citizen’ have you ever thought about what “Aging Gracefully” is?

Many of us are confronted with all types of challenges to that concept- not the Aging, but the “gracefully”. What is your idea of what that means for your life now? To help you contemplate how to employ “Aging Gracefully” in your own life, here is a definition of what the Healthline website defines it as:

Aging gracefully isn’t about trying to look like a 20-something — it’s about living your best life and having the physical and mental health to enjoy it. Like a bottle of wine, you can get better with age with the right care.

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Black History Spotlight & Painting for Well-Being

Painting for Health & Well-Being

This year during Black History Month I would like to celebrate Alma Woodsey Thomas, an artist of remarkable accomplishment.
Thomas, started her painting career at the age of 70, after being a junior high school teacher for 35 years.  YES! We can create “new beginnings” even in our senior citizen years.

Thomas’s parents migrated from Georgia to Washington, D.C. in 1906.  In 1932 she became the first graduate of the Fine Arts department at Howard University, which is also the Alma Mata of the first African/Asian vice president of the United States, Kamala Harris.  After graduation from Howard, in 1925, she taught Art at Shaw Junior High School until 1960.  During her teaching career, she managed to also earn degrees from Columbia University and from New York University. 
Thomas considered giving up Painting when she retired because of arthritis pain. However , in 1966 Howard University offered to mount a retrospective of her work. That’s when she decided she wanted to produce new paintings.

Alma Thomas was later honored with one-woman exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Corcoran Gallery of Art. In 1972 her painting Red Roses Sonata was selected for the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Before her death in 1978, she was nationally recognized as a key woman artist dedicated to abstract painting
Some of her other well-known paintings are: Fiery Sunset, Snoopy Sees Earth Wrapped in Sunset.

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